The browser you are using is not supported. Some critical security features are not available for your browser version.
We want you to have the best possible experience with BLENDERender. For this you'll need to use a supported browser and upgrade to the latest version.
$0.00

Description

Title:
Real Camera
 
Creator:
Wolf
 
Verified on:
2.93
 
Links:



Real Camera

Description

Real Camera is an add-on that allows you to control the Blender camera like a real world camera.

With Autoexposure and Autofocus this addon allows you to save some time when it comes to the final adjustments to the camera.
 
 

Guide

1. Now you can enable the Auto Exposure panel and it will start working


2. or if you click the camera in the scene and switch to the camera properties you can enable the Real Camera panel


3. and use the Auto Focus feature


 

There are two Real Camera panels when you enable the addon: "Real Camera” in the camera properties tab and "Auto Exposure” in the render properties tab.

Note: Auto Exposure is only compatible with Filmic color management

 

Real Camera panel


This panel is shown in the camera properties tab when you select a camera in the scene.

It gives you some sliders as well as the Auto Focus feature.

To use the Auto Focus feature you just have to enable the checkbox, this will automatically shoot a ray from the center of the camera’s view and hits an object in a specific point, this point will be automatically set as the focus point.

If you want to bake the autofocus for an animation, then just choose the step (the rate to insert each keyframe) and click on the bake button.

Once baked the autofocus you can always unbake it just by clicking again the bake button.

 

Auto Exposure panel


This panel is shown in the render settings tab if you are in both Eevee and Cycles.

Enabling the autoexposure feature will do nothing if you aren’t in rendered mode in the viewport (this feature only works for the viewport).

Once in rendered mode, you will see that the exposure (brightness) of the scene is already changing.

The way this feature works is like a real world camera autoexposure feature: it takes some values from the viewport, averages them, and then changes the brightness accordingly.

There are 3 modes of autoexposure, but the most common one (found on most real world cameras) is Center Weighted.

 

Parameters

  • Real Camera panel
  • F-Stop: Aperture f-stop number of the camera’s lens, it gives the Depth of Field effect
  • Shutter Speed: Shutter Speed is the exposure time for the camera’s sensor: from 1/10000 to 10 seconds, it gives the Motion Blur effect
  • Autofocus: Shoots a ray from the center of the camera’s view to the scene, when it hits an object it will read the distance and then sets the focus point automatically
  • Step: the baking step is the number of frames jump to insert keyframes
  • Bake/Unbake: bake/unbake the autofocus for the entire animation
  • Focus Point: distance from the camera to the object
  • Focal Length: the zoom of the camera in mm

 

Auto Exposure panel
  • Metering mode: different common algorithms to sample the pixels in the viewport
  • Center Spot: Sample the pixel in the center of the window (not accurate and used only if the object to be properly exposed is exactly in the pixel in the center of the viewport)
  • Center Weighted: Sample a grid of pixels and give more weight to the ones near the center of the window (most widely used by cameras since it properly exposes the subject in the center)
  • Full Window: Sample a grid of pixels among the whole window (used for open environments where the whole image needs to be properly exposed)
  • EV Compensation: value between -3 and +3 gives you the opportunity to overexpose or underexpose the scene
  • Circles: for Center Weighted, from 2 to 20, gives you the ability to choose how many pixels are being sampled: note, more circles means more accurate exposure but also slower viewport
  • Grid: for Full Window, from 2 to 20, gives you the ability to choose how many pixels are being sampled: note, more grid means more accurate exposure but also slower viewport

Rating & Reviews

0

Based on 0 Ratings

  • 5 Star
  • 4 Star
  • 3 Star
  • 2 Star
  • 1 Star